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THE SUN  

Why We Study the Sun  
The Big Questions  
Magnetism - The Key  

SOLAR STRUCTURE  

The Interior  
The Photosphere  
The Chromosphere  
The Transition Region  
The Corona  
The Solar Wind  
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SOLAR FEATURES  

Photospheric Features  
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THE SUN IN ACTION  

The Sunspot Cycle  
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Coronal Mass Ejections  
Surface and Interior Flows
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PREVIOUS PROJECTS  

GOES SXI Instrument  
MSFC Magnetograph  
MSSTA  
Orbiting Solar Obs.  
Skylab  
Solar Maximum Mission  
SpaceLab 2  
The Sun in Time (EPO)  
TRACE  
Ulysses  
Yohkoh  

CURRENT PROJECTS  

GONG  
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FUTURE PROJECTS  

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SpaceLab 2

SpaceLab 2

Click on image for larger version.

Spacelab 2, launched on the Space Shuttle Challenger on July 29, 1985, carried several solar instruments including the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP), the Coronal Helium Abundance Spacelab Experiment (CHASE), the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS) , and the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SUSIM).

The SOUP instrument was designed to observe the strength, structure, and evolution of magnetic fields in the photosphere and to determine the relationship between these magnetic elements and other solar features. It obtained a superb sequence of images showing the structure and evolution of the solar granulation.

The goal of the CHASE experiment was to accurately determine the helium abundance and to derive the temperature, density, and composition of the coronal gas from measurements of ultraviolet emissions.

The HRTS experiment studied features in the chromosphere, corona, and transition region using a telescope and spectrograph to observe emissions in the ultraviolet region of the solar spectrum.

SUSIM was used to determine both the long-term and the short-term variations in the total ultraviolet flux emitted by the Sun.

Solar Interior Web Links

STS 51-F (KSC)

NRL HRTS Instrument

NRL SUSIM Instrument

Web Links
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NASA Logo Image Author: Dr. David H. Hathaway, david.hathaway @ nasa.gov
Curator: Mitzi Adams, mitzi.adams @ nasa.gov

Last Updated: August 11, 2014